resume-writing-dallas-header.jpg



Contents


Definition

Curriculum Vitae vs. Resume

Resume Formats and Samples

Resume Writing Techniques

Top Two Tips

Resume Quiz

External Links

References


Definition

The word "resume" comes from French which means "summary". A resume, also called "job resume", is a written document presented by a job seeker to a prospective employer, outlining his or her personal details, educational background, qualifications, work experience, etc.[1]
  • A resume is usually accompanied by a cover letter which introduces the applicant and the resume itself to the employer.[2]
  • A resume serves as a marketing tool for job applicants, portraying their talents and maximizing their attractiveness as potential employees.[1]
  • The purpose of a resume is to secure an interview. It offers the employer a first impression of the candidate. Based on this first impression, a decision will be made in regard to whether or not an interview is granted.[3]
==


==

Curriculum Vitae vs. Resume

"Curriculum vitae" is the Latin expression used for "Resume" which is the American English usage.[4]The primary differences between a resume and a curriculum vitae (CV) are the length and content. "A CV is expected to have a length of 2 or more pages while a resume should be less than 2 pages.[5]" As for the content, a resume emphasizes information on job-related skills and experience, while a CV, which is mainly used in the scientific and academic fields, includes a summary of education and experience as well as publications, awards, presentations, research projects and professional associations.[6] In America, the United States and Canada, people use a resume as a general rule. However, in other parts of the world such as Europe and Asia, most employers prefer to receive a curriculum vitae [5].
==


==
which-resume-format.jpg
Which format is most suitable for you?

Resume Formats and Samples

1.Chronological Resume

A chronological resume presents a candidate's employment history "in reverse chronological order[7]". In other words, it starts with a job applicant's present or most recent job. This resume format makes a job seeker's career growth easy to follow and builds additional credibility for being more fact-based. A chronological resume is recommended in the event that job applicants have a strong, solid work history.[8]
Chronological Resume Sample

2.Functional Resume

Instead of focusing on chronological work history, a functional resume puts more emphasis on a job hunter's actual skills and accomplishments rather than details in relation to when and where these capabilities were acquired.[9] Therefore, functional resumes are also called skill-based resumes. A functional resume works well for job applicants who are new to the workplace or have employment gaps. This format also has an advantage over others when targeted positions require a very specific skill set or have specific attributes. [10]This is because a functional resume can help candidates highlight their skills and strengths which exactly meet these particular requirements.
Functional Resume Sample

3.Hybrid Resume

As the name suggests, a hybrid resume (also called combination resume) combines elements of the aforementioned two formats. Generally speaking, a hybrid resume first lists a job applicant's skills, qualifications and accomplishments, which resembles the functional resume format. Next it gives potential employers a clearer picture of his or her chronological work history. [11]Although a hybrid resume format balances the advantages and disadvantages of chronological and functional approaches, it tends to be too repetitive and lengthy.
Hybrid Resume Sample

How to choose a format for your resume

The best resume format for a job hunter is the one that fits his or her personal job-search situation. The chronological form is suited to candidates who have a long and diverse employment history. On the contrary, other two styles are propitious to candidates with little work experience. It's well worth for job seekers to take the time to customize their resumes.[12]

==


==resume_writing.jpg

Resume Writing Techniques

Resume Layout

A resume is a short account of the details of your life and is laid out in a clear form. The layout of a resume is flexible, but it is quite common to organize details under six headings as follows[13]:
a) Contact Information
  • name in full
  • date and place of birth
  • marital status
  • address
  • telephone number
  • E-mail address
b)Objective
  • the specific position you are applying for
c)Education
  • a precise record of schools and colleges attendedResumeTemplate.jpg
  • examination qualifications
  • degree awards
d)Work experience
  • a precise record of employment positions held (including part-time work)
e)Honors & Activities
  • i.e. any associations to which you have belonged
f)References
  • names, professional titles and detailed adresses of people who will write a reference for you

Resume Appearance

  • Paper:

    Select a paper color appropriate for your readers: "Ivory, off-white, beige, and pale gray are safe choices. A bright color may be exactly what you want if you're applying for an advertising position in a progressive firm. [14]" However, colored paper is inappropriate for a business letter for it makes you appear "manipulative and pushy[15]".
  • Margins:

    make sure the text does not cover the entire page; enough margins are necessary especially at the top
  • Bullet points:

break up information and make the resume easy to read
  • Font:
types: a) Serif Fonts (those with feet like "Times Roman","Bookman" and "Georgia")
b) Sans Serif Fonts (those with no feet like "Arial","Tahoma" and "Verdana") [15]
size: a) heading: 12 or 14 points
b) body: 10 or 12 points [15]
(Remember to keep consistent with your font choices and styles throughout your resume)
  • Graphical elements:

use shadings, underlines, bold text, and italic text to emphasize points which you want readers can catch at a glance
(Remember not to overuse these graphics or they will lose their impact[16])


Resume Content ArrangementPiles_web.gif

1. Focusing on relevant information

Do not expect to put all your experience, achievements and skills onto one piece of paper. The content of your resume should be selective. Your resume only needs to include the information which is most relevant to the job you're applying for. [17] Keep in mind what are required on the job advertisement and prove your capabilities with specific information. “No two jobs are the same.[18]” It is crucial to tailor your resume by highlighting “how you fit the particular needs of the company[18]”.


2. Four Key Elements
No matter what kind of job you are applying for, the following four main themes are of greatest interest to all employers: "volunteerism, association memberships, computer proficiency and knowledge of other languages[19] ".

In today’s business world, the sense of social responsibility is well advocated. Recruiters are seeking for not only an employee but “a well-rounded member of society[19]” . For juniors and seniors, their participation in volunteer programs and any associations can make up the lack of work experience. Meanwhile, with the development of informationization and economic globalization, knowledge of computers and that of a second or third language can certainly separate you from other candidates.

3. Identify Keywordsjknn21l.jpg

Nowadays it is common that employees are asked to submit electronic resumes which will be stored in resume databases. In order to target the most relevant resumes, recruiters search these databases using industry-specific or position-specific keywords. These keywords are mainly nouns and phrases "which highlight technical and professional areas of expertise, industry-related jargon, for example[20]." Resumes with the greatest number of “hits” on keywords will be filtered out and read by a human employer, while others without these keywords may be deleted immediately.[21] In this case, your resume should include as many industry and job-specific keywords as possible. [22]

How to identify keywords

  • read over recent job advertisements and find out the words that reappear consistently
  • Talk to people in the career field you are targeting, and ask them what keywords are appropriate to the positions you are applying to. [20]
  • Visit professional association Web sites, and include some industry-related jargon in your resume

Resume Word-Choice

1. Be Concise

Make your statement as concise as possible, with no more than 3-4 lines per bullet point. Unless you are applying for a very high position, keep your resume to one page.[23] “Try to edit out pronouns and articles and begin sentences with verbs.[22]” You are not supposed to use "too pedantic words such as obscure abbreviations and recondite words[21]”. Your prospective employers will be upset if he has to look up while reading your resume. Bear in mind that you should avoid clever wordplays and keep your wording clear and straightforward. [21] Most importantly, although your description is short and brief, it still needs to make sense.

2. Action Words

Start each explanation of your skills or accomplishments with action words (in past tense), such as implemented, executed, organized and so on. These strong action words serve well in catching the reader’s eye and reflecting your self-confidence. [24]
See the following list from
http://www.bc.edu/offices/careers/skills/resumes/verbs.html

Top Action Words

Management skills
Communication skills
Clerical or detailed skills
administered
analyzed
assigned
attained
chaired
contracted
consolidated
coordinated
delegated
developed
directed
evaluated
executed
addressed
arbitrated
arranged
authored
corresponded
developed
directed
drafted
edited
enlisted
formulated
influenced
interpreted
approved
arranged
catalogued
classified
collected
compiled
dispatched
executed
generated
implemented
inspected
monitored
operated
Research skills
Technical skills
Teaching skills
clarified
collected
critiqued
diagnosed
evaluated
examined
extracted
identified
inspected
interpreted
interviewed
investigated
assembled
built
calculated
computed
designed
devised
engineered
fabricated
maintained
operated
overhauled
programmed
adapted
advised
clarified
coached
communicated
coordinated
developed
enabled
encouraged
evaluated
explained
facilitated
Financial skills
Creative skills
Helping skills
administered
allocated
analyzed
appraised
audited
balanced
budgeted
calculated
computed
developed
forecasted
managed
acted
conceptualized
created
designed
developed
directed
established
fashioned
founded
illustrated
instituted
integrated
assessed
assisted
clarified
coached
counseled
demonstrated
diagnosed
educated
expedited
facilitated
familiarized
guided

3. Be ConsistentIn your resume, full sentences are not necessary, but verb tense should be consistent. Use the past tense to describe duties you have done before and use the present tense for duties you are performing currently. [17]
Good Examples:
"Prepare boxes for the daily shipping order (current)
filed 40 documents with the federal courthouse (past) ”[18]
Bad Examples:
"Filing 40 documents with the federal courthouse
Have planned 62 office trainings that included more than 400 people per training"[18]



Resume Proofreading

Your potential employers may receive hundreds of resumes within a single day and they have to skim through your resume very quickly. If they find any spelling or grammatical mistakes, they are very likely to immediately assume that you are not qualified for the job you want. [25] In order to make a good impression, it is quite important to proofread your resume after you finish it. You can do it by yourself or ask friends to help.
See the following Resume Proofreading Checklist from
http://www.trustyguides.com/resumes8.html

Resume Proofreading Checklist

1. How does your resume look? Are the spacing and margins flush and consistent?
2. Is your personal information correct (e.g. Address, e-mail, phone number)?
3. Are there periods after complete sentences that end a line? If not, then make sure you are consistent.
4. Did you use the correct tenses, and use them consistently? Use present tense for current jobs and past tense for past jobs.
5. Did you use correct grammar and punctuation?
6. Are numbers written correctly? Write out the numbers from one to nine, and use numerals for 10 and above, except when beginning a sentence (spell out numbers beginning sentences).
7. What are the one or two weakest points of content? Can you improve them by substituting an active verb for an overused adjective?
8. Finally, have a friend look closely at your resume, even a professor or contact at the company you are applying to. Their edits can prove crucial.


==

==resume-cartoon.jpg

Top Two Tips

1. Don't get caught "copying" text. [26]

Although numerous resume templates and samples are available online, yet you should not plagiarize them.

2. Don't lie in your resume.[27]

Every HR department does background checks these days. If you are caught cheating, your credibility will be ruined for good.



==


==

2019-business-solvency-quiz-answers1.jpgResume Quiz

Below is a resume quiz which can help you consolidate what you have learned so far about resume writing.

(This quiz is from http://www.1st-writer.com/resume-quiz1.htm)
Question 1. What is a resume?
A. an autobiography of one's career life
B. a detailed listing of a job candidate's skills, experience, qualifications and achievements related to the position being targeted
C. a complete listing of an individual's education, work experience and professional training
Question 2. What is the purpose of a resume?
A. Establish a candidate's qulifications for a position in order to secure an interview
B. Establish a candidate's qulifications for a position in order to secure employment
C. Establish a candidate's qulifications for a position in order to eliminate competition
Question 3. What is the best type of resume to use?
A. Chronological format
B. Functional format
C. Depends on your particular situation
Question 4. What is the appropriate length of a resume?
A. one page, no longer
B. two pages, no longer
C. whatever number of pages is necessary to qualify the candidate
Question 5. What is the main focus when you are writing a resume?
A. who will be reading my resume
B. presenting my skills, experience and achievements which are most relevant to the position you apply for
C. the readability and visual presentation of your resume
Question 6. What can you do if you don't have experience in the work you want to apply for?
A. make something up and list a friend's phone number as the reference
B. give up your dream
C. get experience by doing part-time or volunteer work
Question 7. How can you make your resume look better ?
A. use white space (leave enough margins)
B. spray it with perfume
C. use size 8 Comic Sans font because it's fancy and fun

Answers: B A C A B C A

=


=

External Links

http://www.career.vt.edu/ResumeGuide/Index.html
http://www.worksmart.ca.gov/tipsresume.html
http://www.resume-resource.com/examples.html
http://owl.english.purdue.edu./workshops/hypertext/ResumeW/yourresume.html
http://iupui.edu/~career1/resume2.htm
http://www.myresumeonline.org/
=

References


[1]http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/719/1/
[2]http://www.thejobexplorer.com/Cover_Letter/[3]http://www.career.vt.edu/ResumeGuide/Index.html[4]http://web.mit.edu/career/www/guide/cv.pdf[5]http://how-to-write-a-cv.org/difference-between-cv-and-resume.html[6]http://www.cv-resume.org/pages/cv_definition.php[7]http://www.cv-resume.org/pages/resume_format.php[8]http://www.how-to-make-a-resume.org/chronological-resume.html[9]http://www.uwec.edu/Career/online_library/Functional_resume.htm[10]http://www.uwb.edu/careers/job-search-tools/resumes/functional-outline[11]http://www.resumeformat.org/hybrid-resume-format.html[12]http://www.career.vt.edu/ResumeGuide/FormatSamples.html[13]Fu, Siyi. A Practical Writing Course for College Students. Beijing: Peking University Press, 2003. Print.[14]http://leo.stcloudstate.edu/resumes/resumeappear.html[15]http://www.resumewriting.net/styles.htm[16]http://www.sru.edu/academics/enrollment/career_services/Pages/ResumeAppearanceGuidelines.aspx[17]http://www.wellesley.edu/cws/students/content.html[18]http://www.northorion.com/resume-writing-tips-a-techniques-0495/[19]http://www.collegeboard.com/student/plan/high-school/36957.html[20]http://www.bc.edu/offices/careers/skills/resumes/keywords.html[21]http://www.trustyguides.com/resumes4.html[22]http://jobsearch.about.com/od/resumes/a/draftdesc.htm[23]http://www.questoutplacement.com/resume_guide.htm[24]http://www.bc.edu/offices/careers/skills/resumes/verbs.html[25]http://www.trustyguides.com/resumes8.html[26]http://www.bc.edu/offices/careers/skills/resumes/samples.html[27]http://www.dailywritingtips.com/resume-writing-tips